Should ISPs be privacy crusaders?

I was somewhat miffed that submissions from Telecom and Vodafone (who account for the vast majority of Internet connections) on the Telco Spying Bill did not call for protecting the privacy of their customers from government’s intrusive and ubiquitous surveillance plans. Both submissions before the Law and Order Committee last week were essentially about protecting their business interests.

Then it struck me that it was exactly the right perspective for them to take. Why did I do an about turn on this? Here’s why.

Continue reading

In praise of the NZ Government

It is so easy to see faults and shortcomings in what the NZ Government has done in the Internet area. Once in a while, not too often, it is worth stepping back and look at the good things. Otherwise, instead of a balanced view of how things are going, we fall into the trap of only reinforcing the negatives. It needs to be objective praise, not the blind faith of political supporters.

Continue reading

Musicians and the Internet

There probably is no one better than Amanda Palmer when it comes to understanding the essence of the Web and being a musician. Many, if not most, musicians would not be able to, or even want to, be like her. But in a world of being inundated with propaganda against music piracy, hers is a voice we must hear.

Check out her TED talk and decide for yourself.

Source: http://www.ted.com/talks/amanda_palmer_the_art_of_asking.html

Will the 3 strikes law fail? Part 3: conclusions

In a previous post I looked at the aims of New Zealand’s 3 strikes law and then in a second post agreed with Dr Rebecca Giblin’s recent paper On the (New) New Zealand Graduated Response Law (and Why It’s Unlikely to Achieve Its Aims) that the law will have “limited success.” In this third and final post, I conclude that, at this point of time, the law is likely to fail in its primary aims but have some relatively minor successes. This failure comes at a cost.

Continue reading

Will the 3 strikes law fail? Part 2: assessment

In a previous post I looked at the aims of the 3 strikes law to start assessing Dr Rebecca Giblin’s recent paper On the (New) New Zealand Graduated Response Law (and Why It’s Unlikely to Achieve Its Aims) which “outlines a number of technical and practical reasons why it’s unlikely to achieve its aims.” In this post, that assessment is completed to conclude that the law will have “limited success” as the paper suggests. In the third and final post on this topic to follow, I will look at the aims of the 3 strikes law that the paper did not cover as well as provide my own conclusions about the law.

Continue reading

Will the 3 strikes law fail? Part 1: aims

There is no robust, objective evidence of the failure or success of the 3 strikes law that I’m aware of. With the first hearing under the law scheduled to be heard by the Copyright Tribunal next month, it could be argued that it’s too early to tell. However, according to the very knowledgeable Dr Rebecca Giblin of Monash University, the law is likely to end up as a failure. Earlier this month she published a paper On the (New) New Zealand Graduated Response Law (and Why It’s Unlikely to Achieve Its Aims) which “outlines a number of technical and practical reasons why it’s unlikely to achieve its aims.”

Continue reading